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Rubber Gloves / Disposable Latex Gloves

Wear exam-grade disposable latex gloves to stay clean and protected while treating patients or handling hazardous substances. Latex gloves are the most comfortable disposable rubber gloves to be found, and provide maximum flexibility and the best possible fit. Even if stretched, they’ll usually snap right back into shape. They are therefore the preferred choice of countless professionals. Read more...

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Latex Gloves Uses: What are Latex Gloves Used for?

Latex gloves are very versatile disposable rubber gloves, and can be used for multiple purposes. Don them before cleaning, painting, caring for a baby, or doing any types of crafts. They are also commonly worn by those in the medical fields for hygienic reasons. Auto care is another industry that utilizes these gloves. Others who wear latex work gloves include scientists, chefs, bakers, plumbers, and waiters. 

Why are Latex Rubber Gloves the Most Popular Medical Gloves?

Disposable latex rubber gloves have many benefits over vinyl and nitrile gloves, and are therefore the gloves most commonly used in the healthcare industry. 

Unlike their aforementioned synthetic counterparts, latex exam gloves are comprised of natural rubber, and are biodegradable. These gloves offer the highest level of tactile sensitivity. Disposable latex gloves protect against both bacteria and viruses. They are, hands down, the most comfortable medical gloves, and offer the wearer unprecedented dexterity. 

Powdered vs. Powder Free Latex Gloves

A couple of years ago (on 12/19/16 to be exact), the FDA banned the usage of medical-grade powdered latex gloves. They did this because powdered gloves were causing allergic reactions and triggering skin sensitivities of patients. 

Some nurses preferred powdered latex gloves since they are very easy to put on. 

Powder free latex gloves, which can and should be used in healthcare facilities, are harder to don and remove. This is due to the chlorination process which makes these gloves powder free. 

Chlorination Process: Disposable latex gloves are soaked in a chlorine solution, and then rinsed and dried. This process removes most (if not all) of the powder, as well as the latex proteins. 

What Can I Do if I Have Latex Glove Allergy?

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, up to 17% of medical professionals have allergic reactions to latex gloves. This percentage is much higher than the maximum percentage of 8% among individuals in the US.

This is because medical workers who use latex products often are more likely to become allergic to latex. Repetitive wear of disposable latex gloves has been shown to increase the likelihood of latex allergies or irritant contact dermatitis (Binkley, Schroyer, & Catalfano, 2003). 

If you believe you have developed a latex allergy, the best thing would be to stop wearing disposable latex gloves and start wearing nitrile exam gloves, vinyl gloves or another synthetic glove option instead. While many modern latex gloves have significantly reduced allergen properties, someone who has a true latex allergy should not use gloves containing any latex. This is confirmed by Kathy Nix in her article for Infection Control Today: “There’s only one safe option for a natural rubber latex allergic person, and that is no natural rubber (2006).”

Even if caregivers don’t suffer from a latex glove allergy themselves, they are advised to use caution as patients they come in contact with may be sensitive to latex. If you do choose to use latex gloves, Nix states that you can prevent developing a latex allergy over time by “wearing low-protein, low- or non-powdered latex gloves [since doing so] greatly diminishes the risk of allergic reactions and the likelihood of healthcare workers developing latex sensitivity.”

Choosing the Right Size Latex Rubber Gloves

Before clicking the add to cart button, be sure to check the size of the gloves you’re looking at. Latex exam gloves are available in different sizes. There are small latex gloves, medium, large, & XL latex gloves available. 

It’s always better to choose the size disposable latex gloves you think would make sense for you rather than getting a one-size-fits-all style that quite possibly won’t fit well.

How to Save on Latex Exam Gloves

If you’re looking for cheap latex gloves, you can often get a better deal when buying a big box of latex gloves. Buying bulk latex gloves, or getting them by the case, often comes out to be more cost-efficient than getting smaller quantities at a time. 

Prevent cross-contamination and keep things sanitary in your facility by keeping a box of rubber gloves easily accessible. This will allow professionals to wear latex rubber gloves throughout the entire shift, and to easily change to a new pair when necessary. 

Where Can I Buy Latex Gloves?

If you’re wondering where to buy latex gloves, here’s your answer: AvaCare Medical. AvaCare Medical has a huge selection of different colored latex gloves, in many sizes and styles. 

Whether you want a feminine color and are searching for purple or pink latex gloves, you’d prefer something more classic like white or black latex gloves, or you just want a pair of plain and simple blue latex gloves; you can find the hue you want quickly and easily.

If you’d prefer long latex gloves, which allow for added coverage and protection, you can find that as well! 

Browse our site and view the best quality disposable latex gloves available today. Keep your home, office or exam room well-equipped, and stock up today on bulk latex gloves from AvaCare Medical!

References

Binkley, H. M., Schroyer, T., & Catalfano, J. (2003, April). Latex allergies: A review of recognition, evaluation, management, prevention, education, and alternative product use. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC164902/

Dix, K. (2006, March 01). The New View on Latex Allergies. Retrieved from https://www.infectioncontroltoday.com/hand-hygiene/new-view-latex-allergies